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Trop – Too, too much, too many

Trop – Too, too much, too many

Today we’ll have a look at the adverb trop. There are two main ways to use this word: Trop + adjective means “too + adjective” and trop de + noun means “too much” or “too many”. The pronunciation of trop is “troh”. The final p is silent.

trop – [tʀo]

too

FrenchLearner Word of the Day lesson explaining how to use the adverb trop, meaning too, too much and too many.

Word origin

The Modern French adverb trop comes from throp in Frankish, an extinct Germanic language. Throp refered to a group, cluster or village and had the underlying meaning of beaucoup (a lot). Over time the meaning of trop evoloved to indicate excess.

Example sentences

This first example sentence uses the structure trop + adjective, meaning “too + adjective”. The negation ne + verb + rien means “nothing” or “anything”.

Tu parles trop vite. Je ne comprends rien !

You’re speaking too fast. I don’t understand anything!

The structure trop + de + noun means “too much + noun” or “too many + noun”. For example, trop de temps (too much time) or trop d’œufs (too many eggs).

J’ai trop de travail en ce moment.

I currently have too much work.

Nous avons trop de tomates dans le jardin cette année.

We have too many tomatos in the garden this year.

In French slang and among young people, trop as a synonym for très to mean “very”. This is considered improper French. Note that this sentence can also translate to “She is so beautiful”.

Elle est trop belle !

She’s very beautiful!

Word of the Day lessons

The French advert trop means "too". Trop de + noun means "too much" or "too many".
The French adverb trop means “too”. Trop de + noun means “too much” or “too many”.

Lessons by David Issokson

Conclusion

Et voilà ! Now you know how to use trop in French! Now check out these two related lessons covering assez (enough) and beaucoup (a lot, many, much)

References

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David Issokson
David Issokson is a lifelong language learner and speaks over seven languages. Of all the languages he speaks, he's the most passionate about French! David has helped hundreds of students to improve their French in his private lessons. When not teaching or writing his French Word of the Day lessons, David enjoys his time skiing, hiking and mountain biking in Victor, Idaho.

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David Issokson

David Issokson is a lifelong language learner and speaks over seven languages. Of all the languages he speaks, he's the most passionate about French! David has helped hundreds of students to improve their French in his private lessons. When not teaching or writing his French Word of the Day lessons, David enjoys his time skiing, hiking and mountain biking in Victor, Idaho.

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